Category Archives: TIKI TIME

Our tiki bar adventures

Portland’s Tiki Kon 2018

Portland’s Tiki Kon 2018: Dipping our toes into the rum-soaked tropical fantasy-land of the Tiki revival community

 

Both Paddy and I have always been fans of mid-century pop culture. I’m also a big fan of Polynesia and spent some time living in Hawaii and learning about Pacific Island cultures in college. Since then, I had always fantasized about having a basement Tiki bar in my house.

In 2015, we bought a house with a basement and I convinced Paddy that a Tiki bar was of utmost necessity. We found vintage bar at an estate sale, put up some grass matting and bamboo, a grass thatch overhang and invested in a Tiki mug collection. We’ve realized since the initial build-out of our Tiki bar that adding to a Tiki bar can easily become an obsession. I began reading up on Polynesian Pop and Tiki cocktails, and we formed a hobby of scouring antique stores for mid-century treasures and Polynesian art. When we read that Portland, Oregon hosts an annual Tiki Kon every summer, we figured it might be time to check out this cult that we may have inadvertently joined.

Tiki Kon started as a small bar crawl of home Tiki bars in the Portland area in 2003, and has since become a fairly large production. It is run by a couple with the help of volunteers, in addition to their full time jobs. This is no small undertaking and I am very impressed with what they have managed to pull off. It seems that the Tiki revival is growing, which was confirmed when the Tiki Kon website crashed within minutes of tickets going on sale this year.

The site crash was a bit of a mess, and I really felt for the producers as they scrambled to go through transactions by time stamp and sort out over-sold VIP tickets. We had opted to just purchase a la carte tickets to the Friday and Saturday night events, and our ticket purchase made it through and was not part of the oversold ticket group.

The hot item was the VIP ticket, which included all events, a private VIP cocktail lounge, and a Sunday home Tiki bar tour. The home bar tour had a hard limit on the number of guests that could be accommodated on the buses and in the home Tiki bars, so unfortunately there were some folks who were disappointed by having their ticket downgraded or refunded. All in all, it was well handled and the Tiki Kon producers upgraded their website to handle more traffic and ticket sales.

*Tip: Ticket sales happen in March, and they go FAST. If you want to attend Tiki Kon, make your ticket selection before the go-live time and get your purchase in online ASAP. Also, make sure you have a PayPal account. I’m not sure if they plan on taking credit cards in the future, but this year PayPal was the only payment option.

Each year has a theme, and this year’s theme was Fantasy Island.

Tiki Kon 2018
Tiki Kon 2018

Custom souvenir Tiki mugs are produced for each year, but in limited quantities of 100. You can go online before the event and try to buy one for $100 when they go on sale, and invites to buy are sent to ticket holders only. They sell out within 5 minutes of going on sale. The Tiki mugs were really cool, and I understand the whole limited-edition collector mentality, but I’m not so keen on only allowing a small fraction of guests to acquire a souvenir Tiki mug for Tiki Kon. Yes, this makes them more valuable and more coveted, but it makes them nearly impossible to get and extremely exclusive. All in all, we didn’t really want to spend $100 on a Tiki mug regardless–but they were really cool.

2018 Tiki-Kon mug
2018 Tiki-Kon mug. Image from www.tikikon.com

 

Day 1:

We opted to take Friday off of work and left Seattle around 8:30 AM, and made record time down to Portland with no traffic. I would recommend not trying to drive to Portland on a Friday afternoon from Seattle. We did this once and hit Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia, and Portland rush hours and it took 5+ hours to get there. Not worth it. Take the day off if you are driving from Seattle and trying to get to Portland on a Friday night, or take the Bolt Bus in the early afternoon.

After arrival in Portland, we went straight to the Hawthorne neighborhood to get lunch and do a little vintage shopping. We opted for sandwiches at Lardo, partly because it looked amazing, and partly because they had frosty cold AC and house-made Arnold Palmers.

I had the Italian Tuna sandwich, which was delicious but a little salty with the olive tapenade. I scraped it off and the sandwich was perfect without the tapenade.

Italian Tuna sandwich at Lardo, Portland
Italian Tuna sandwich at Lardo, Portland

Paddy had the Second Hand Smoke brisket sandwich with pickled serrano peppers, American cheese and smokey mayo, which he loved. He also had a side of their potato salad which tasted just like a baked potato. We would definitely come back here.

Second Hand Smokesandwich at Lardo, Portland
Second Hand Smoke sandwich and potato salad at Lardo, Portland

After lunch, we went swag lamp shopping at the Lounge Lizard up the street. Lounge Lizard is a great place to shop for mid-century modern furniture and lamps, and other antiques. They have a small amount of vintage clothing as well. They have two locations on Hawthorne Blvd, very close to each other. We found a blue vintage swag lamp at the Eastern location on Hawthorne, and Paddy found a very groovy 70’s polyester shirt. He doesn’t know where he will wear it, but there will be some occasion I’m sure.

Lounge Lizard, Portland
Lounge Lizard, Portland

We also made a last shopping stop at Fat Fancy, a used clothing store for plus size people. It’s my favorite store in Portland and has moved from downtown to the Hollywood area of East Portland. They have a parking lot now. I found a couple used Torrid tops and the sales lady was very friendly and helpful. If you are plus size, check this place out.

After lunch and shopping, we were ready to check into the hotel and relax for a bit. We had reserved a room at the historic Palms Motel in North Portland. We chose this hotel for the low price ($120/night), the location across from the Alibi Tiki Lounge and near the Mississippi neighborhood, and for the sign out front. The sign out front was a significant draw. I mean, it has a blue monkey.

Palms Motel Portland
Palms Motel Portland

The rooms were clean, and the beds were decent. It is a cheap motel, no frills. But the AC was nice and frosty and there was a fridge, both being a necessity on the 95-degree July weekend. There was even beer left in the fridge from the previous renters. I suppose that means that housekeeping wasn’t super thorough, but I won’t fault them for leaving free beer. There are worse things to overlook.

Palms Motel, Porland
Palms Motel, Portland
Palms Motel, Porland
Palms Motel, Portland

We checked in and relaxed a bit before getting changed into our Tiki Kon attire and heading across the street to the Alibi Tiki Lounge for food and drinks.

The Alibi Tiki Lounge, Portland
The Alibi Tiki Lounge, Portland
The Alibi Tiki Lounge, Portland
The Alibi Tiki Lounge, Portland

The Alibi is a classic Tiki bar, since 1947. It’s gone through some changes over the years, but the epic flashing neon sign and dark kitschy Tiki atmosphere remain and flourish. The Alibi is mostly known to locals as a karaoke dive bar, but no matter what time of day you go, it’s fun. Be prepared for crowds on weekend evenings.

We opted to eat here, although I can’t say I recommend coming here for the food. The food is alright, if you are drinking and need some fried food to soak up booze. However, we just wanted dinner to be cheap and easy and being able to eat some food along with our Tiki drinks was the ideal situation at the time. It was happy hour, and we had the garlic green beans, the potstickers, the chicken fingers, and the lumpia. It was all average.

The Alibi Tiki Lounge, Portland
The Alibi Tiki Lounge, Portland

They have alcoholic slushies at the Alibi, which on a hot day go down really easy. I had the strawberry daiquiri slushy and Paddy had the Alibi Old Fashioned cocktail. They were selling signature Tiki mugs for $20 with a drink in them, so I got my slushy in a souvenir mug.

Alibi souvenir Tiki mug
Alibi souvenir Tiki mug.

After we had food and drinks, we caught a Lyft to Tiki Kon to check out our first a la carte evening show, which was a “surf and turf” show featuring surf rock bands and a “horror” theme.

We checked in at the Tiki Kon booth and acquired our “passports” with stamps for the events that we had paid for. To enter and exit the event, we needed to show our passports. They were pretty fun little souvenirs and very nicely done, with info inside about Tiki Kon and the events of the weekend.

Tiki Kon passport
Tiki Kon passport
Tiki Kon 2018
Tiki Kon 2018

A few vendors were selling artisan Tiki mugs and other items, and there was a bar with pre-mixed signature cocktails of the evening as well as beer and wine. There was a photo op area, which of course we took advantage of.

Tiki Kon 2018
Tiki Kon 2018

In the main event room, there was a dance floor, stage, and large tables with table clothes and small centerpieces. People-watching was pretty fun, everyone had put a lot of thoughts into their outfits.

The Red Lion event room setting sort of made it feel like we were at a wedding. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I was hoping for a little more Tiki atmosphere, which is a big part of what Tiki is all about. However, I can see how challenging creating that atmosphere would be in this location and for an event this size. They did a good job with what they had to work with…but….we still felt like we were at a wedding. I suppose that is the nature of a convention.

We were trying to brainstorm on what they could do to create more Tiki atmosphere at future events that would be cost-effective and easy to put up and take down. I think if they had a large storage space and a lot of theatrically-minded volunteers, they could create some stage set walls on casters with fake lava rock (spray painted black styrofoam?) or jungle foliage or bamboo. These could be constructed and then wheeled in and out and stored somewhere the rest of the year. This would of course require ample volunteers, truck rentals, and a large storage space for the “sets.” But it would be an idea to take Tiki Kon to the next level. Some paper lanterns strung across the space overhead could really add a lot of atmosphere too. Again, this would require a lot of set up and take-down volunteers. Looking at the enthusiasm for the event around us at the event, I think there would be a lot of people willing to volunteer time in exchange for free or discounted tickets.

We knew no one at this event, so we decided to sit at a central empty table and let people sit with us. It worked, we ended up with friendly company quickly. We met two other couples–one who had been to one Tiki Kon before, and another couple who were newbies like us. They had also opted to just do the a la carte Friday and Saturday events to check it out without going full throttle.

Tiki Kon 2018
Performance by MeduSirena Marina Tiki Kon 2018
Tiki Kon 2018
Tiki Kon 2018

There was a dance performance by MeduSirena Marina, a professional mermaid, and then three surf bands: Jon and the Vons from France, The Boss Martians, and Satan’s Pilgrims. All had go-go dancers and put on a good show.

Go-Go dancer for The Boss Martians, Tiki Kon 2018
Go-Go dancer for The Boss Martians, Tiki Kon 2018

Our new friends both left before we did due to the fact that there was no food at the event. The lack of food is my main critique of  Tiki Kon. If you plan on serving people copious amounts of booze, food is essential. I think there might have been some catering in the VIP suite parties, but for us lowly basic ticket holders, there was no food to be found. I think if Tiki Kon could convince the hosting hotel to put some food trucks in their parking lot from 8:00 PM on, it would keep people partying longer and the local food vendors would make a ton of money.

We really wanted to stick around and check out Satan’s Pilgrims, but even we eventually succumbed to the drunk munchies and left a bit early as well. We took a Lyft back over to the Mississippi neighborhood near our hotel and found a taco truck.

 

Day 2:

The next morning, we thought we’d head over to Mississippi Ave and get breakfast at Miss Delta, one of my favorite Portland restaurants. Unfortunately, there was a street fair being set up all along Mississippi Ave and Miss Delta was closed so that they could set up a street fair booth for lunch. There was only one restaurant open for breakfast across the street with a very long wait list.

Our new friends Tom and Sarah from Tiki Kon were local and had suggested the Cadillac Cafe in the Irvington neighborhood as a good spot for breakfast, so we got in the car and drove there.

There was no wait and the food was amazing. We were so happy we took their advice.

Cadillac Cafe
Cadillac Cafe

I had the smoked salmon hash with house-smoked salmon, green beans, leeks, potatoes, eggs, and lemon dill creme fraiche. Paddy had the eggs in purgatory with cheesy grits and a Cajun-Creole sauce. Everything was delicious and the service was great. There is even a real mint-condition 1950’s pink Cadillac on display in the restaurant.

Smoked salmon hash, Cadillac Cafe
Smoked salmon hash Cadillac Cafe
Eggs in purgatory, Cadillac Cafe
Eggs in purgatory and a side of bacon, Cadillac Cafe

After breakfast, we went back up to Tiki Kon for their Saturday Tiki Marketplace.

The Tiki Marketplace is open to the public and free to enter. It ended up being our favorite part of Tiki Kon, as it gave us an opportunity to look at the work of a lot of amazing artists and craftspeople we’d never heard of, and shop for items to add to our home Tiki Bar.

We were immediately drawn into the vintage Aloha shirt and dress racks that were front and center in the market. It was a little intense–people were furiously and aggressively flipping through racks of dresses, kaftans, and mumus. I didn’t see anything in my size and didn’t really expect to, so I quickly lost interest and exited the vintage clothing feeding frenzy while Paddy persisted.

Tiki Kon Saturday Marketplace
Tiki Kon Saturday Marketplace

At the next booth I found a fabulous vintage lamp for only $65, and we also bought several art prints at other vendor booths to decorate our home Tiki bar with.

Tiki Lamp
Awesome lamp we scored for our home Tiki bar at the Tiki Kon marketplace!

Later that afternoon, we met up with our new Tiki Kon friends Tom and Sarah at Portland’s other Tiki bar, Hale Pele.

Hale Pele has been written up as one of the top 10 Tiki Bars in the world by Critiki.com, and we had not been there yet. Just for Tiki Kon weekend, they opened early at 2:00 PM (normally they open at 4:00 PM daily). Sarah and Tom were regulars at Hale Pele, and they had some great food and drink recommendations for us.

Hale Pele is easy to miss from the street, which is sort of a classic Tiki bar thing. The idea is to create a hidden, exotic, transporting environment that assaults your senses when you open the door. Tiki bars are also supposed to be fairly dark, so no windows to the outside world. As soon as we walked in, we knew why it was rated as one of the world’s best. It is small and intimate, with a ton of attention to detail. The owners clearly put a lot of love into this bar, and it shows.

Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland

If it is your first time at Hale Pele and you are not driving after you leave, order the Jet Pilot cocktail. It is quite a production and does not disappoint. It also tastes amazing and is super strong. I really liked that Hale Pale divides their drink menu up into sections according to how strong the drinks are, so you know what you are getting into. Paddy opted to be the designated driver, so he chose a cocktail off the weaker list. I ordered the Jet Pilot.

The Jet Pilot comes on fire, and just before it is served, the lights in the bar flicker and thunder sounds are played over the speakers. The bartender brings out the drink and sprinkles cinnamon onto the open flame, causing a large fiery flare. It was really quite exciting (Did you know cinnamon was flammable? Neither did we).

The Jet Pilot, Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
The Jet Pilot, Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Jet Pilot, Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Jet Pilot, Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland

Tom and Sarah told us that we HAD to try the Hawaiian bread, which is grilled and buttered and sprinkled with sea salt, served with a guava jam. It was delicious and yes, you HAVE to order it.

We tried a few of their other small plates as well, and everything was outstanding. We spent some time talking to the friendly bartender/manager Sierra, who was a lot of fun and really seems to enjoy her job. We will be back to Hale Pele on our future trips to Portland for sure.

Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland
Hale Pele Tiki bar, Portland

For dinner that evening we wanted to save a little money and go somewhere relatively inexpensive. Tom and Sarah recommended Tamale Boy for good inexpensive Mexican fare. I had the tacos de pescado and Paddy had a quesadilla. Both were excellent. Tamale Boy is attached to the LABrewatory brewery next door, and you are welcome to eat your food from Tamale Boy while sampling LABrewatory’s beers in their taproom.

Tamale Boy and LABrewatory on N Russell Street, Portland

 

The Tiki Kon event for Saturday evening was fairly similar to the night prior, with more bands and a cabaret act by the Starella Sisters. When we arrived they were just finishing the Iron TikiTender bar-tending competition, where bartenders from Tiki Bars around the country compete for the Iron TikiTender title and a grand prize trip. The winner was Jeanie Grant from San Francisco’s Pagan Idol Tiki Bar. After the competition, we were able to walk into the main event room and get a view of the three finalists’ over-the-top drink garnishes.

Iron TikiTender
Iron TikiTender finalists’ elaborate drink garnishes made during the competition
Iron TikiTender
Iron TikiTender finalists’ elaborate drink garnishes made during the competition
Iron TikiTender
Iron TikiTender finalists’ elaborate drink garnishes made during the competition

The evening was yet again another big Tiki fashion show and we enjoyed checking out everyone’s fun outfits and accessories. There was a charity raffle with proceeds supporting the people affected by the volcanic lava flows in Hawaii.

We had a few drinks and watched the music for a while (more awesome surf music by a band called Tikiyaki 5-0. It was fun, but we didn’t stay until the end.

Tikiyaki 5-0
Tikiyaki 5-0

On the way back to the hotel we stopped into The Alibi again for a late night snack and another drink. It was packed with karaoke revelers. The Alibi is a hoppin’ place on a Saturday night!

Palms Motel Sign at night
Palms Motel Sign at night

 

There were a lot of Tiki Kon events that we skipped, including a banquet dinner and Polynesian dance show, and several educational symposiums. The VIP package included a home Tiki bar tour on Sunday, which is extremely popular (a tour of Portland’s home Tiki bars including bus transportation). It seemed that the magic of Tiki Kon really is in knowing people in the Tiki revival community, and getting a VIP ticket that includes the VIP lounges and the home Tiki bar tour. We only dipped our toes in the lagoon for this event.

Would we go again? Well…it was fun, but I think the people who have the most fun are the hardcore loyal returnees, who know each other and look forward to celebrating with each other at this event every year. There were a lot of events we opted not to pay for or participate in, so we can’t give an accurate review of the entire weekend. The highlights of the weekend for us were visiting Portland’s Tiki bars the Alibi and  Hale Pele, and the Tiki Kon Saturday Marketplace. I think that if we go again, we may just get a la carte tickets to only one of the evening events and hit the Saturday Marketplace and the local Tiki Bars.

I did just see an announcement that Tiki Kon is moving to the DoubleTree Hilton Lloyd Center, closer to one of my favorite Portland neighborhoods (Buckman) and downtown. It is clear that the interest in Tiki Kon is growing, and I’m curious to see what next year brings. The fact that a couple with full time regular jobs put this event together in their spare time is really impressive, and I think the event will continue to grow.

Other Tiki events that happen annually around the country are Tiki Caliente in Palm Springs, CA, The Hukilau in Fort Lauderdale, FL, and Tiki Oasis in San Diego, CA. Of the three Tiki Oasis seems to be the largest event. I’m curious about checking out Tiki Oasis, but it would be a splurge between airfare, hotel, and the event tickets. If we combine it into a vacation to San Diego it might be pretty fun. I also saw something about a second Tiki Oasis going on in Arizona starting in 2019. The Tiki revival continues to expand.

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #7: The Monkey’s Uncle Cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #7: The Monkey’s Uncle cocktail: Coconut, banana, and rum. Strong, ridiculous, and banana-rific.

 

Technically, this drink was originally called the “Castaway” in Adam Rocke’s Tiki Drinks cocktail recipe book. But then we tasted it, and our friend Heather re-named it the Monkey’s Uncle cocktail, which is a much more befitting name.

I used Meyer’s dark rum, 99 Bananas banana schnapps, and coconut cream in a squeezy tube that I found at the grocery store. In retrospect, the coconut cream was probably not the best quality, and a true coconut cream made from coconut milk and not a crazy amount of sugar in a squeezy mayonnaise-like bottle may have been a better choice.

coconut cream
The coconut cream I used. Is made from real coconut, but has a ton of sugar and preservatives. Very sticky.

I’d be into trying this drink one more time with homemade coconut cream, but it was a bit much for me as it was. It was one of those drinks that makes you laugh after you take a drink, it was ridiculous. But hey, if you really like banana flavor—this one is for you.

The Monkey’s Uncle cocktail (“Castaway” in Adam Rocke’s Tiki Drinks recipe book)

2 oz dark rum

1 oz banana liqueur

1 oz cream of coconut

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice, add ingredients, and shake well. Strain into an ice-filled old fashioned glass. 

 

Monkey's Uncle cocktail
Monkey’s Uncle cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #6: The Caribbean Hummer Cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #6: The Caribbean Hummer Cocktail: A slightly smokey scotch and rum concoction that may be an acquired taste.

 

On New Year’s Eve with a few friends, we embarked on another beverage adventure in Adam Rocke’s Tiki Drinks cocktail recipe book. The Caribbean Hummer cocktail had a bit of an off-color name, and a bit of an off-color taste. The mix of ingredients in the recipe were ingredients I would have never personally chosen to mix together, but the result was strong and unique. The scotch component was very prominent, and as a person who does not like scotch, it wasn’t the cocktail for me.

Paddy, however, loves scotch and enjoyed this one. Be warned, it’s a strong one. “Puts hair on your chest,” as my Dad used to say about such things.

Caribbean Hummer cocktail:

1 oz light rum

1 oz dark rum

1/2 oz. Scotch

1/2 oz pineapple juice

7-Up or Sprite

Fill a collins class with ice, add all ingredients (except 7-Up), stir and fill with 7-Up. Garnish with a pineapple wedge. 

We didn’t have a pineapple wedge, which definitely would have made the drink more aesthetically pleasing.

Caribbean Hummer cocktail
Caribbean Hummer cocktail

 

Overall, I would only recommend the Caribbean Hummer cocktail to someone who likes scotch and wants to mix it up a bit. Cheers.

 

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #5: Amberjack Cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #5: Amberjack Cocktail. Simple and fruity, this tiki drink tastes like the tropics without a lot of fuss.

 

Cocktail number 5 in our Tiki Cocktails book by Adam Rocke was the Amberjack. The most difficult thing about it was procuring a bottle of applejack brandy, for which I had to visit a BevMo in a different neighborhood as the one nearest to our neighborhood was out of stock.

**Tip: BevMo has their inventory posted online, so you can look it up before you make the trek out to their store. I’m all about supporting small local liquor stores, but there aren’t many around me and the online stock tool is REALLY handy for unusual liquors. 

The recipe was easy:

Amberjack Cocktail:

1.5 oz applejack (apple brandy)

1/2 oz light rum (we went with a whole ounce–no futzing around)

2 oz orange juice

1 oz pineapple juice

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice, add ingredients, and shake well. Pour into a chilled collins glass and garnish with a maraschino cherry. 

 

Amberjack cocktail
Amberjack cocktail

The recipe didn’t say to pour over ice, but in retrospect a couple large ice cubes would have been nice for presentation (make the glass look more full and support the maraschino cherry garnish) and to keep it chilled.

The Amberjack cocktail was fruity and tropical. We enjoyed it and it was one of our favorites so far. Very easy to make. The applejack adds a very subtle apple component. By itself the applejack almost tastes a bit like whiskey with a subtle apple flavor. It isn’t sweet and artificial tasting like an apple liqueur.

Overall, we’d make the Amberjack cocktail again. It’s an easy one to make at a summer party, although we couldn’t drink very many of them on account of the sugary juice.

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #4: Amaretto Sunset

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #4: Amaretto Sunset: A frozen blended citrus drink with dark rum and a bit of sweet Amaretto almond flavor.

 

The Amaretto Sunset was the fourth drink in my Tiki Cocktails book by Adam Rocke. It is another frozen blended drink, of which I’m a fan. I was new to Amaretto, however, and wasn’t sure what to expect. Sweet almond liqueur in a citrus drink? It sounded funky, but also like it just might work. We gave the Amaretto Sunset a shot.

Amaretto Sunset cocktail recipe:

1 oz. Amaretto

1/2 oz. dark rum (we went with a whole ounce of Meyer’s dark rum)

3 oz. orange juice

1 tsp. lemon juice

3-4 oz crushed ice

Blend all ingredients (except lemon juice) until smooth, pour into a chilled goblet or hurricane glass, and garnish with a maraschino cherry. Float the lemon juice.

We decided that a half ounce of rum was silly, and changed it to a whole ounce. We also ended up using fresh squeezed Meyer lemon juice as a float, because our friend Heather had brought some over. I misread the recipe and added a tablespoon instead of a teaspoon of the Meyer lemon juice as a float on top of the blended cocktail, but since Meyer lemons are sweet it actually worked out pretty well and wasn’t overpowering.

Amaretto Sunset cocktail
Amaretto Sunset cocktail

Overall, the Amaretto Sunset was good and the Meyer lemon juice was a nice touch. I think Amaretto might be one of those a-little-goes-a-long-way ingredients, and this cocktail balanced out nicely. We would definitely recommend increasing the rum amount to a whole oz (or at tiny bit more if you really want to party).

Stay tuned for our next tiki drink adventure!

Amaretto Sunset cocktail
Amaretto Sunset cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #3: Aloha Cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #3: Aloha Cocktail. Creamy, citrus-y and boozy, with dark rum, coconut syrup, orange juice, pineapple juice, lime, and vanilla ice cream.

 

Looking at the ingredients in the Aloha cocktail, I knew it would be a sugar bomb. That being said, I wouldn’t drink more than one of these at a time.

The Aloha cocktail was cocktail # 3 in the Tiki Cocktails recipe book by Adam Rocke. It requires a blender, so be sure to have one on hand for this recipe. I altered the recipe a bit because no one at any liquor stores I went to had heard of Meyer’s Rum Cream Liqueur. Since it already called for dark rum and ice cream, I figured that there was enough cream in the cocktail already and doubled up on the dark rum instead.

aloha cocktail
Aloha Cocktail: We used Meyer’s dark rum and torani coconut syrup

The Aloha Cocktail:

1 oz. dark rum (we used Meyer’s, easily found at most stores that sell liquor)

1 oz Meyer’s Rum Cream Liqueur (Again, couldn’t find this anywhere, so we just used a second shot of Meyer’s Rum)

2 oz orange juice

2 oz pineapple juice

1 oz coconut syrup (we used Torani coconut syrup)

1 tbsp. lime juice

1 scoop vanilla ice cream

2-3 oz crushed ice

Blend all ingredients until smooth, pour into a chilled goblet or hurricane glass, and garnish with a pineapple wedge. (We didn’t do the pineapple wedge garnish, as we didn’t want to purchase an entire pineapple for one drink. I do think it would have made for a nicer presentation, however).

Aloha Cocktail tiki time
Aloha Cocktail

The Aloha cocktail came out creamy and frothy, but not super thick. It was very sweet, but the lime juice and orange juice helped balance it out a bit. The rum, pineapple juice, and coconut syrup were the star flavors, making it taste a bit like a piña colada, but a bit more citrus-y.

Overall, we liked this drink. It definitely tasted like Hawaii. We couldn’t drink more than one in a sitting due to the sugar content and ice cream, but we would definitely make the Aloha cocktail again.

Aloha cocktail
Aloha cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #2: Agent Orange Cocktail

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #2: Agent Orange Cocktail. Vodka, apple schnapps, Midori, grenadine, orange juice, and ice. Blended, frozen, and very orange.

Continuing with our New Year’s resolution 2017 to make all the tiki drinks in the tiki drink recipe book Tiki Drinks by Adam Rocke, we concocted recipe # 2: The Agent Orange Cocktail.

Tiki Drinks recipe book by Adam Rocke
Tiki Drinks recipe book by Adam Rocke

The Agent Orange cocktail is a blended drink, and we actually invested in a blender for our tiki cocktail adventure. After reading up on good drink blenders under $100, we purchased a Ninja NJ600 for $89. We really wanted the Vitamix, but we didn’t have the funds available to live the fancy Vitamix lifestyle yet. Based on the reviews and our budget, the Ninja NJ600 looked like a good bet. Overall, it blended nicely and we were happy with our purchase.

Agent Orange cocktail recipe
Agent Orange cocktail recipe

We used Stoli vodka, Dekuyper Sour Apple Pucker, Midori, Rose’s grenadine, and natural orange juice. The Sour Apple Pucker and the Midori are both emerald green, so I wasn’t sure what they would do to the color of the drink, but the orange juice and the grenadine completely masked any green color when blended.

agent orange cocktail
Agent Orange cocktail ingredients

Agent Orange Cocktail:

3/4 oz. vodka

1/2 oz. apple schapps

1/2 oz. melon liqueur

2 tbsp. grenadine

4 oz. orange juice

3-4 oz. crushed ice

Blend all ingredients until smooth, pour into a chilled goblet or hurricane glass and garnish with an orange slice.

Agent Orange cocktail
Agent Orange cocktail

Paddy liked the Agent Orange cocktail a lot. I enjoyed it at first, but towards the last sip it started to taste a little sickly sweet to me. It really does taste like orange candy, sort of like an orange Jolly Rancher, but you can still taste the natural orange juice. If you had me try and guess the ingredients, I would never have guessed that Midori or Sour Apple Pucker were in the Agent Orange cocktail, but they really added to the sweet orange flavor along with the grenadine.

Overall, we both agreed that there was not enough booze in it. If we were to make it again, we would add an extra shot of vodka. 3/4 of a shot is not enough for this drink.

If you like orange-flavored candy and sweet drinks, you’ll like the Agent Orange Cocktail. Good for a hot summer day.

Tiki Time Cocktail Hour #1: Acapulco Cocktail

Adventures in tiki cocktails: recipe number one in Tiki Drinks by Adam Rocke. The Acapulco cocktail- rum, triple sec, lime, sugar, and egg white.

 

I’m not really big on New Year’s resolutions. However, this January I was flipping through Adam Rocke’s Tiki Cocktails recipe book that someone had given us as a tiki bar warming gift, and decided that our New Year’s resolution for 2017 should be to make all the tiki cocktails in the book and blog about them.

There are 60+ cocktails in the book, so I’m not sure that getting through them all in one year is realistic, but the journey of 60 cocktails begins with one drink, right? Right. And with the non-stop political horror show going on this year, I feel like this is a good resolution for 2017.

Cocktail #1 was the Acapulco cocktail. Seemed easy enough, although I’m always a little sketched out by drinks that have egg whites in them. We gave it a shot.

acapulco cocktail
Acapulco Cocktail–Tiki Cocktails by Adam Rocke #1
acapulco cocktail
Acapulco cocktail ingredients

For the egg whites, I bought Egg Beaters pasteurized egg whites in lieu of fresh egg whites as I am afraid of salmonella. I doubled the ingredients so that we could each try one, adding them all to the martini shaker and shaking with ice.

Acapulco cocktail:

1.5 oz. white rum

1/2 oz. triple sec

1/2 oz. lime juice

1/4 tsp. sugar

1 egg white (or three tablespoons Egg Beaters egg whites)

Mint leaf for garnish

The egg whites created such a froth that they oozed out of the sides of the shaker top a bit. The result was a frothy, opaque drink.

Acapulco cocktail
Acapulco cocktail

I would describe the Acapulco cocktail as the bastard love child of a Mojito and an Orange Julius. A bit more citrus than a traditional Mojito, and the creamy frothiness of an Orange Julius. I thought the mint was just a garnish to make it pretty, but it really added to the experience as you smelled it as you drank. It gave a nice mint essence without being a strong flavor.

Paddy and I both liked it. I don’t think I would go out of my way to make it again or order it in a bar–I’m still not a huge fan of egg whites in cocktails. However if someone made an Acapulco cocktail for me or wanted me to make them, I would definitely drink it again.

Cheers!

Building a Basement Tiki Lounge

Building a basement Tiki lounge: How we turned our drab basement into a retro tropical Polynesian retreat

 

I’ve always had a fascination and appreciation of Polynesian culture. I studied art and anthropology (including Pacific Island cultures) at the University of Hawaii Manoa on a year long program in college, and fell in love with Polynesia. We were fortunate enough to take our honeymoon in Tahiti and French Polynesia in 2010, and I’ve been itching to go back and explore more islands ever since.

When we decided to buy our first house last year, Paddy had a requirement that it needed to have a basement–with a bar. I was 100% in agreement, but it had to be a tiki lounge. We love the kitsch and retro nostalgia of the tiki bars of the 50’s and 60’s, when Hawaii’s statehood came to be and a booming post WWII economy allowed Americans to travel more. Polynesian culture and tropical exotica became all the rage, with restaurants such as Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic’s in California starting a nation-wide trend of Mai Tais and Zombie cocktails, “exotica” music and tropical fashion.

As luck would have it, we got a house with a basement. A finished basement at that. It was a dream come true.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
Our basement before

The quintessential item in a tiki lounge is a bar.

Scouting Craigslist, we came upon several retro bars for sale but the prices were either exorbitant or they sold so fast that we didn’t stand a chance. I finally found a bar for $200 that looked cool, but the photo was terrible. It was covered with stuff, and taken at a bad angle. It looked like it might be cool, or at least we could make it cool with some work. I noticed it had been on Craigslist for awhile, so I finally emailed the guy and offered him $100 for it. He told me he was selling items from a family estate far from where he lived, so he didn’t want to go there unless we were definitely going to buy it. We decided to go for it as long as I could get it in my truck, and settled on $150. It was an awesome bar, in an awesome basement that hadn’t been redecorated since the 1960’s. There was even a rotary dial phone on the wall in the laundry area. We had a hell of a time getting it out of their basement through the garage, and strapped it rather precariously into my truck with rope, but we did it and the vintage bar made it back to our basement.

We already had a couple of vintage bamboo bar stools that Paddy had acquired somewhere down the line, and we found a couple more rattan bar stools and a bamboo/rattan style futon on Craigslist as well, which we ordered a new tropical cover for and matching pillows. We had a lot of unpacking to do and other more pressing home projects, so we hung up our tiki bar paddle, a few vintage framed records from Hawaii and Rarotonga, and called it good until we had time and energy to deck it out.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
Basement bar decked out for our Christmas party, not quite tikilicious yet.

 

About 9 months went by, and finally we were ready to start finishing our tiki lounge. I wanted to go all out.

First, I measured the back wall of the room and the wall area behind the bar, and ordered several rolls of Lauhala matting (woven grass mats) on ebay (I found the best price on 48″ x 96″ rolls there), and four rolls of 36″ x 72″ natural bamboo fencing from Home Depot. We screwed the Lauhala mats to the wall, cutting out a section around the window. I used a stud finder to find the wall studs on the wall behind the bar, and marked them on the crown molding with masking tape so that we could easily find them later when we installed the bar shelves.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
Lauhala matting screwed on the wall
how to build a basement tiki lounge
marking the wall studs with masking tape to find them later

The matting was hard to keep completely flat, so we struggled a bit with some bubbles that kept appearing when we were installing it. We got it about as flat as we could.

When cutting around the window, it was hard to keep a straight cut line. Fortunately, we planned on covering the window frame with bamboo, so my bad cutting job would be hidden eventually.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
Not the straightest cutting job…

I had to cut out around an electrical panel next to the bar as well, and it didn’t look so awesome with the frayed grass mat edges. I got a roll of Lauhala ric rac on Etsy for $15.50 and used it to frame the edges around the electrical panel by gluing it with a hot glue gun. It looked much better and kept the cut grass from fraying any further. We did a border trim along the top of the matting on the wall as well, which gave it a more finished look.

http://www.displaycostume.com/
Lauhala ric rac around the cut-out matting for the electrical panel gave it a more finished look

Next, I ordered a 30″ x 96″ Mexican palm thatch runner from Forever Bamboo. We were trying to figure out how to create an overhang behind the bar that we could drape grass thatch over to give it that authentic tropical tiki lounge look. I drew up a plan of a frame we could construct and hang on the wall, but Paddy thought we could find something pre-made. I couldn’t find anything small and pre-made online. While we were pondering this conundrum, I remembered that there were some closet bars in a storage room in the basement installed by previous owners. It was perfect! I was stoked–we didn’t have to buy or build anything!

how to build a basement tiki lounge
closet bars!

At first we thought that hanging the supports upside-down would be best to give the bar the sloped-overhang we originally pictured.

how-to-build-a-basement-tiki-lounge

Unfortunately, while this looked cool, it would have been better on a very high ceiling. It covered up too much of the wall that we planned to use for bar shelves.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
tiki lounge grass thatch overhang using closet bars.

We put them right side up, which helped hold it up a lot better.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
tiki lounge grass thatch overhang using closet bars.
how to build a basement tiki lounge
tiki lounge grass thatch overhang using closet bars.
How to build a basement tiki lounge
Finnigan wanted to help.

Next we un-rolled the fencing and propped it against the wall and then Paddy screwed it to the wall below the matting. We had one electrical outlet we had to cut bamboo out of, but fortunately it was very low on the wall and we only had to cut a couple pieces off at the bottom end of the second roll. Paddy was able to do this (carefully) with a small hand saw.

How to build a basement tiki lounge
bamboo fencing as wainscoting.
how to build a basement tiki lounge
Cut out in bamboo fence for electrical outlet

As luck would have it, we had a couple pieces extra on the end of the last fence roll, so Paddy cut the wire holding them on and took them off. We screwed them to the wall above the fence roll to create a border and a more finished look.

How to build a basement tiki lounge

Next, we got some inexpensive brown shelves and supports from Home Depot and screwed them into the wall studs behind the bar in front of the matting. The top shelf still wasn’t very visible with the grass overhang, and it was bothering us. It was also hanging at about eye-level and was very annoying if you were behind the bar.

We remedied this by getting two thin pieces of tack board cut 18″ wide by 48″ long (our bar overhang was 96″ long), which Home Depot cut to size for us, and put it under the grass to give it a wider “shelf” to hang over. It worked perfectly.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
Putting tack board under the grass overhang to lift it up and out further
how to build a basement tiki lounge
tack board under the grass overhang to prop it up and out further

After the bar was set up, we had to do something about the window frame and my bad matting cut-out job. I ordered a four-pack of 60″ long 5″ diameter split bamboo poles from Sunset Bamboo. Unfortunately they sent us full rounds, and it was a several week ordeal with a call tag and a reshipment to get the right items, with very poor customer service. We finally got the right product though.

Two of the 60″ lengths we were able to install over the window frame on the top and bottom without cutting, and the middle ones we cut to size with a chop saw. We put screws in the wall and the window frame and wired the bamboo poles on, so that they would be easy to take off if we ever wanted to.

how to build a basement tiki lounge
Installing the bamboo split poles over the window frame
how to build a basement tiki lounge
Installing the bamboo split poles over the window frame

We were finally ready to decorate. The best part.

We added some fun lights that we got from the party supply store below each shelf behind the bar–bouys and parrots. To illuminate the top shelf, we got the Dioder LED 4 piece light strip pack from Ikea for $29.99. You can daisy-chain them together like we did for behind a bar, or seperate them out into four segments to put inside book cases. It was an awesome purchase. You can choose from a rainbow of colors, or make the lights fade in and out of each color with a handy little control.

how to build a basement tiki bar

A guy in a nearby neighborhood had a “tiki sale” at his house where we picked up some vintage tiki mugs, a poster, a really cool vintage bamboo chair, and some postcards from Hawaii and Tahiti from the 1960’s. No tiki lounge is complete without tiki mugs.

how to build a basement tiki bar
Tiki mugs!

I got red and orange paper lanterns and pendant lights from Paper Lantern Store which added some warm funky ambiance to the room. The lime green rotary dial phone in the photo below is the phone I grew up with–and I’m so glad I kept it. It sits proudly in our tiki lounge in all of it’s lime green glory.

how to build a basement tiki bar

Shortly before we moved, I found this tiger print chair sitting front and center on display at the Ballard, Seattle Goodwill. I had to have it. The Goodwill employee I had write a furniture sale tag up for me said there was a lady who told her she was coming back for it. But she didn’t pay for it. And I had cash and a truck. I win.

Paddy added a Ralph Steadman poster from Hunter S. Thompson’s Hawaii-based book The Curse of the Lono. He’s a big fan.

how-to-build-a-basement-tiki-lounge (9)

We found a pretty cool coconut lamp/chandelier  in Mexico, and a preserved puffer fish at a nearby antique mall in Burien, WA. We got a tiki mask at Home Depot and some glass floats at Party Display and Costume.

how to build a basement tiki bar

I re-covered all the bar stools with Tommy Bahama fabric from Joann Fabrics so that they would match.

My last addition to the bar was a painting of a hula girl in the moonlight that I painted myself.

how to build a basement tiki lounge

We would like to re-do the floors in wood laminate next year and get rid of the old carpeting, and get some tiki god side tables to replace the boring ones, but for now we’re going to call it good. We finished the tiki lounge just in time for a Forbidden Island party we threw and it was super fun.

One of the biggest elements of a great tiki lounge is kitsch. As years go by, I’m sure we will find all sorts of things to add to the bar in our international travels and wanderings through antique malls. Our tiki lounge will always be a work in progress.

13323667_10153390652771157_6408668732131277590_o (1) 13340127_10153390669076157_7458600667825801723_o 13340129_10153390674516157_3737727957755190999_o 13350282_10153390670186157_4243973147207673314_o13392099_10153390652676157_5111952035351130764_o13320931_10153390669101157_2463032285864270268_o