Our Top Food Experiences From Our Adventures

Our top food experiences from our adventures 2008-2015: Our most memorable meals from our travels around the world (so far).

10. The Winding Stair in Dublin, Ireland

Given that everything in Ireland is expensive, we couldn’t eat out at many upscale restaurants on our two-week trip. The Winding Stair was our one big splurge in Ireland, and it was worth it. It is located above an affiliated book store (one of the oldest independent book stores in Dublin) overlooking the River Liffey. It was cute, quiet, and romantic. The food is fresh, organic, and locally sourced.  If you’re in Dublin looking for a fantastic Irish meal with ambiance, this is a great little spot. Definitely one of our top food experiences in Ireland.

River Liffey, Dublin
River Liffey, Dublin
Winding Stair Dublin Ireland top food experiences
Duck breast with fingerling potatoes at The Winding Stair
Winding Stair Dublin Ireland top food experiences
Pork loin at the winding stair

9. Kèköldi Indigenous family farm, Costa Rica

Our friends Sarah and Julio took us to a farm owned by the indigenous Kèköldi people near Cahuita, Costa Rica. Our host gave us a tour through the rain forest surrounding his home and told us about all the medicinal plants and foods found in the area that are used by his family. Afterward, we were served a typical lunch of chicken, plantains breadfruit, and sweet potatoes served in banana leaves, which are used as plates and bowls. The chicken was some of the best we’d ever had and it was a very interesting and educational day. If you are interested in taking this tour, you can book it through Sarah and Julio’s tour company, www.boyerotours.com.

Kekoldi indigenous tour costa rica top food experiences
Lunch at the Kèköldi farm: Chicken, breadfruit, plantains, and sweet potato
Kekoldi village costa rica top food experiences
Julio and our host at the Kèköldi farm, Costa Rica

8. Argentinian cooking at Tierras Del Sol, Tulum, Mexico

When we were in Tulum, Mexico in 2009, we stayed at a little place on the beach called Tierras Del Sol (unfortunately, it looks like it is now closed). The beach was the best we’ve ever seen in our travels to the tropics, and because it was the low season we usually had it all to ourselves.

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Tulum Beach

It was located at the very end of the Boca Paila Rd, about 12 miles from the center of town and we had no car. They served dinner and breakfast, and the manager/cook was from Argentina and cooked amazing food every night. It was pretty much the same menu: three salads, grilled vegetables, and then grilled meat or fish with an Argentinian marinade. We stayed for four nights, and ate three dinners there it was so good. Each night the grilled meat or fish was whatever looked fresh at the market that day. One night we ventured further down the road to a neighboring bungalow resort and ate at their restaurant, but the food was small, pretentious, and not nearly as good.

Simple and delicious, served with a side of peace and quiet, the warm sea air, and plenty of beer and margaritas. It was one of our top food experiences for sure.

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Top food experiences –Tierras Del Sol restaurant/lounge area

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Tulum-Mexico-top-food-experiences (12)

tulum-mexico top food experiences

7. Kuma’s Corner, Chicago

Paddy maintains that one of the best burgers he has ever had (perhaps THE best burger he has ever had) was at Kuma’s Corner while we were visiting a friend in Chicago in 2008. Located in the Avondale neighborhood, Kuma’s Corner is all about two things: amazing burgers and heavy metal. And burgers named after heavy metal. What more could you want?

It sounds gimmicky, but the real rock star here is the food. Most of the burgers are served on pretzel buns, and really are in a league of their own. If you go to Chicago, don’t miss Kuma’s.

Kumas Corner Chicago top food experiences
At Kuma’s Corner, Chicago
Kumas Corner Chicago top food experiences
The “Slayer” burger at Kuma’s Corner. Served with ANGER!

 

6. The Jam Cafe, Victoria B.C. Canada

We spent a holiday weekend in Victoria BC in 2014, and we were surprised to find so much great food! It was tough to choose which one of our meals that weekend would wind up on our top food experiences list, but we decided it must be the Jam Cafe. We had pulled pork pancakes (large enough to feed a family of four) and the fried chicken benedict and shared. The bloody marys were also fabulous and are served with a piece of candied bacon and a seasoned salt rim. It was one of the best breakfasts we’ve ever had, and worth the 20 minute wait in line.

A close second of our top food experiences in Victoria: Red Fish Blue Fish. It was almost a coin toss.

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The Jam Cafe, Victoria B.C.
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Bloody Mary at the Jam Cafe with candied bacon
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Pulled Pork pancakes with jalepeno sour cream and pickled cabbage
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Fried chicken benedict with roasted corn salsa

5. Atchafalaya, New Orleans

Atchafalaya New Orleans
Atchafalaya restaurant–brunch highly recommended!

We spent Halloween 2015 in New Orleans, which I’m sure you know is home to some pretty spectacular cuisine. The winner from this trip was definitely brunch at Atchafalaya in the Garden District. They had a delicious-looking breakfast cocktail list, but we couldn’t pass up the bloody mary bar where you can build your own bloody mary from two different types of mixes, and an array of hot sauces and house pickled veggies to go with it. The bartender gives you a glass with your choice of vodka and you make it however you want it.

Atchafalaya bloody mary bar New Orleans
Atchafalaya bloody mary bar
Atchafalaya bloody mary bar New Orleans
Atchafalaya bloody mary bar-green tomato bloody marys!

The breakfast menu made for a tough decision. I eventually decided on the duck hash with blackberries, mangos, duck confit, potatoes, hollandaise sauce, and bacon vinigarette. Paddy had the shrimp and cream cheese grits with smoked tomatoes and andouille sausage. Our friends tried the fried chicken and biscuits and gravy, the bananas foster french toast, and the truffled eggs with spinach. It was all amazing. They also serve dinner, and we will definitely be back on our next visit to NOLA.

Chicken and biscuits with sausage gravy at Atchafalaya New Orleans
Chicken and biscuits with sausage gravy at Atchafalaya
Duck confit hash at Atchafalaya in the Garden District
Duck confit hash at Atchafalaya in the Garden District
Shrimp with cream cheese grits at Actchafalaya New Orleans
Shrimp with cream cheese grits at Actchafalaya

4. Chiky Blu Restaurant in Bayahibe, Dominican Republic

On our first night in the small beach town of Bayahibe, Dominican Republic, we ventured into a little unassuming open-air beach restaurant with reasonable prices and ordered up some dinner. I had no idea going in that I would have the best whole fried fish I’d ever had that I still think about to this day. It was simple, but full of flavor, and very crispy without any greasiness. It came with rosemary fried potatoes on a bed of lettuce with three tomato slices on top and a lime wedge.

Paddy had gnocchi which was also excellent. We went back for dinner again on our last night and had the pizza which was also good, but I still think about that fried fish. I haven’t had one live up to that one since.

Chiky Blue Bayahibe, Dominican Republic
Chiky Blu Bayahibe, Dominican Republic
Chiky Blue Bayahibe, Dominican Republic
Chiky Blu Bayahibe, Dominican Republic
Chiky Blue Bayahibe, Dominican Republic
Chiky Blu Bayahibe, Dominican Republic
Fried fish chiky blu bayahibe
Best fried fish I’ve ever had at Chiky Blu

3. Hotel La Pirogue, Taha’a, French Polynesia

We spent our honeymoon in French Polynesia, traveling to Tahiti, Taha’a, and Bora Bora. On Taha’a we stayed on a remote motu island off the coast of the main island of Taha’a at a little resort called Hotel La Pirogue. It was completely remote, so we did the breakfast and dinner meal plan. Breakfast was standard European continental style, with muesli, yogurt, fruit, and baguettes with cheese and ham cold cuts.

hotel la pirogue tahaa
View from our bungalow porch at Hotel La Pirogue on the Taha’a motu

Dinner, however was unexpectedly some of the best food we’ve ever had. The little resort was owned by a French couple who were very welcoming. The husband was an outstanding chef and cooked dinner for the guests while his wife waited tables. We could choose a starter, main course and dessert for dinner each night.

The fusion of French cuisine with local Polynesian ingredients like vanilla, breadfruit, spices, and local fish, and shellfish was innovative and unique. It was some of the best food we’ve ever had.

We spent our days reading books, swimming in the beach in front of our bungalow, kayaking around the lagoon, and day touring the island of Taha’a. At night we would stuff ourselves silly at the restaurant and waddle back to our bungalow to sit on our porch and drink wine in the moonlight. It was a great four days.

Coconut curry shrimp
Coconut curry shrimp
Duck breast
Duck breast
Grilled shrimp at Hotel La Pirogue
Grilled shrimp at Hotel La Pirogue
Seared Ahi tuna
Seared Ahi tuna
Rack of lamb at Hotel La Pirogue
Rack of lamb at Hotel La Pirogue

 

 2. Dill Restaurant in Reykjavik, Iceland

While in Reykjavik, Iceland in 2015, we had made reservations far in advance for Dill, which is arguably the best upscale dining restaurant in Iceland. Chef Gunnar Karl Gíslason takes Nordic cuisine to new and innovative levels, using local ingredients–much along the lines of the world-renowned restaurant Noma in Denmark.

Iceland-Dill
top food experiences –Dill Restaurant in Reykjavik, Iceland

Iceland 107

Iceland-Dill-Restaurant
top food experiences –Dill Restaurant in Reykjavik, Iceland

We may not ever be able to afford Noma ($300 per person for a seven course meal), but we were able to make room in our budget for Dill (much more reasonable at just under $100 per person for a seven course meal). Don’t get me wrong, it was really expensive, but worth it. In this culinary realm, food begins to cross from sustenance to art, bringing new flavors and textures and ideas to the dining experience that have not been done before.

Wine pairings with all seven courses were also offered at an additional $100 per person, but we stuck with one glass of champagne and one glass of red wine each. Our bill at the end was $250, which was slightly less than we had budgeted.

The meal came with four small amuse bouche starters and house-made sourdough rolls. It was a two-hour ordeal, and the most high-end culinary experience we’ve ever had. I hate rutabagas, and the rutabaga course with cream cheese foam, sweet and sour dill oil, and toasted millet was so delicious I almost licked the plate.

Dill Menu
Dill Menu
salt cod course dill restaurant reykjavik
Salt cod course
scallop tartare dill restaurant reykjavik
Scallop tartare course
Iceland-Dill-Restaurant
Pork belly course with kale and black garlic
Dill-Restaurant
Rutabaga course with cream cheese, sweet and sour dill oil, and toasted millet
Dill-Restaurant-2
Icelandic Skyr with celery sorbet and roasted oats

Nothing could really top that dining experience in Iceland, but I will give the lobster soup at Salthusid Restaurant in Grindavik a second prize.

 

1. Farm Pu Nim (Softshell Crab Farm) in Chanthaburi, Thailand

I don’t know where this is or how you get to it, but try to find out if you find yourself in the Chanthaburi province of Thailand. Farm Pu Nim (translates to “softshell crab farm”) was host to the number one of all our top food experiences in our travels to date.

We were visiting a Thai friend of mine and her family in Chanthaburi, Thailand, and they wanted to take us to lunch here. We drove a little ways outside of Chanthaburi town, and then parked and got in a small boat ferrying customers to the restaurant.

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand
top food experiences –Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand

It was busy with Thai tourists and locals (no westerners that I saw), and our friend said it is somewhere that they take visitors or go to on special occasions. They ordered a bunch of dishes for us all to share.

The restaurant kitchen was visible from the path to the bathroom, and was totally chaotic. Piles of sea shells, plastic tubs, and tanks of fish and crabs were everywhere.

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand
The kitchen–Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand
Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand
The kitchen–Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand

Our food arrived in courses, and it was a seafood feast. The food was amazing, and there was so much that we couldn’t finish it all. Oysters, shrimp, squid, a spicy fish soup, fried soft shell crab, soft shell crab in curry, and a whole fried fish with garlic. We’d never seen such a spread.

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand
fried soft shell crab

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand

Shellfish Farm in Chanthaburi Thailand
Shellfish Farm in Chanthaburi Thailand

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand

Soft Shell Crab Farm restaurant in Chanthaburi, Thailand
Oysters

We squabbled over the bill at the end– we insisted on paying as they were taking us around Chanthaburi and being fabulous hosts, and after some arguing we were allowed to pay. For seven people (albeit two were small children), the total for all that food and a couple beers was $45.

A large part of what makes this number one of our top food experiences was the amazing food, but another part was being able to share in something uniquely Thai that our friends wanted to share with us. We would have never found that place on our own, and being able to share it with a long lost friend from my exchange student days and her family was very special.

 

Food is a huge part of our travels, and we hope to add many more meals to this list in the future. A meal doesn’t have to be expensive to be amazing, it just needs to be made with love and either talent or a good recipe. Stay tuned for more of our top food experiences in the future.

Halloween in New Orleans 2015

Halloween in New Orleans 2015: Spooky fun, awesome food, Frenchmen Street, Voodoo Musuem, Garden District, the French Quarter, and a vampire ball

 

Our first trip to New Orleans was ten years ago, in the spring before Hurricane Katrina. We stayed a week and fell head over heals in love with the city. We’d always dreamed of coming back for Halloween, and this year, we finally pulled the trigger and spent Halloween in New Orleans.

Halloween in New Orleans is probably second to Mardi Gras as far as a big city-wide event. It’s not just Halloween night, it is several nights of events and costumed revelry. There are masquerade balls, witches’ balls, vampire balls, parades, haunted history tours, and the annual Voodoo Fest music festival all at once. It is a bit overwhelming, and there isn’t a way to possibly do it all.

If you want to spend Halloween in New Orleans, I recommend planning ahead. Book your plane tickets and hotel early (9 months in advance is a good idea) and do some research to figure out which events are going on in your time frame an what is most important. If tickets are required, purchase early.

Also, bring at least two costumes. New Orleans is serious about costumes, so bring some good ones.

 

Day 1:

Our flight from Seattle arrived into humid New Orleans at 5:30, and getting a taxi to our hotel was a breeze. The taxi line was long, but it moved quickly. There is a mandated flat rate for all taxi fares for two passengers of $36.00 for most parts of New Orleans. The rate increases $15 per extra passenger after that.

We arrived at the Frenchmen 519 condos, where we had booked a two bedroom condo to share with our friend Keith from New York. The location couldn’t have been better–right on Frenchmen Street and in walking distance to everything in the French Quarter. The condo was spacious, had AC, and the beds were comfortable. The front desk is open 24 hours and the desk agent was extremely nice. There is an outside gate with a pass code as well for security. We found the best rate on Booking.com at $250/night.

Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street
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Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street

Frenchmen 519 condo on Frenchmen Street

There was also a pool and hot tub in the back courtyard, but we never had time to use it.

We had three other friends who flew down with us staying a few blocks away at the Lamothe House hotel on Esplanade, which they were very happy with as well.

Our front desk clerk recommended Coop’s Place for dinner, only a few blocks away on Decatur Street. We didn’t have to wait long for a table for 5, but a long line began building after we were seated. I walked by this restaurant a few times during our stay and there was usually a big line for dinner. The menu is a smorgasbord of Cajun/Creole fare and the prices are reasonable.

Paddy and I couldn’t decide, so we both went with the sampler platter which had fried chicken, jambalaya, crawfish etouffee, red beans and rice with okra, and a cup of gumbo. It was a good sampling of New Orleans cooking, and the fried chicken was excellent.

Fried chicken at Coops Place Hallowen in New Orleans
Fried chicken platter at Coops Place
Sampler platter at Coops Place Halloween in New Orleans
Sampler platter at Coops Place

After dinner, we walked down Decatur Street and poked around in the little shops that were still open. Then we turned up towards Bourbon Street.

The first time you see Bourbon Street, it’s kind of exciting. Lots of neon, lots of people, live music pouring out of every bar up and of course the Huge Ass Beers guy selling beers to go.

Bourbon Street Halloween in New Orleans
Bourbon Street
Bourbon Street Halloween in New Orleans
Bourbon Street

Bourbon Street Halloween in New Orleans

Bourbon Street Halloween in New Orleans
Bourbon Street

For most people in the US coming from states with strict liquor laws, being able to get a beer in a to-go cup and walk around is a novelty in itself. When we first came to New Orleans, we didn’t know much about the city and spent most of our nights on Bourbon.

This time, all we saw was tourists. Tourists on balconies trying to get other tourists to show their boobs for beads (wrong holiday, guys), tourists doing bad karaoke, drunk bachelor parties, and most of the music we heard blaring out of the bars were cover bands doing covers of classic rock songs. Our friends hadn’t been to New Orleans before, so we did a thorough walk up and down Bourbon to get a taste, but everyone was over it pretty quickly.

We headed back towards Frenchmen Street on Bourbon, past the very well-decorated gay bars to our favorite bar from our last visit, Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop.

Bourbon Street Halloween in New Orleans
Gay bars on Bourbon Street had the best Halloween decorations
Bourbon Street Halloween in New Orleans
Bourbon Street
Lafittes Blacksmith Shop Halloween in New Orleans
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop

Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop is reportedly the oldest building used as a bar in the US, dating back to 1722. It is dark, using mostly candles as light. The decor is minimal with only old wooden tables and a piano player in the back. The only electric lights are over the bar and over the piano music. There is also a nice outdoor courtyard. We were extremely disappointed this time to see that a digital juke box with neon lights had been added to the wall across from the bar. It’s music competed with the piano player in the back and the neon light was a major eyesore in a dark, historical, candlelit bar.

We still had a good time, and were early enough to get table service. I recommend the local Abita Blackened Voodoo beer or Dixie for something lighter.

Laffites Blacksmith Shop
Lafittes Blacksmith Shop piano player
Lafittes Blacksmith Shop Halloween in New Orleans
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop
Lafittes Blacksmith Shop Halloween in New Orleans
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop

Our friend Keith from New York finally arrived at our condo back on Frenchmen Street, so we headed back there to see what was going on. We met up with Keith and spent some time watching the jazz band on the street corner playing for tips. The crowd was growing, people were dancing, and some dude was walking around selling beers out of a cooler duct-taped to a hand truck. It was a refreshing change from the adult Disneyland that is Bourbon Street.

Frenchemen Street Halloween in New Orleans
Frenchmen Street

After a little while we were in need of more beers, but our entrepreneur with the hand truck cooler was lost among the crowd. We headed over to Dat Dog for drinks and ended up staying for the best hot dogs we’ve ever had. I had the crawfish etouffee dog which was crawfish sausage covered in creole mustard, tarter sauce, relish, tomatoes, and onions. Paddy had the Guinness special which was a Guinness sausage with yellow mustard, bacon, onions, and I’m not sure what else. He said it was amazing.

Also on the menu was duck sausage, alligator sausage, vegan sausage, turducken sausage, Polish sausage, German bratwurst, chili cheese fries, and crawfish etouffee fries, among other items. It was ridiculously good.

Dat Dog Halloween in New Orleans
Dat Dog–we embraced our sausagey bliss.
Dat Dog Halloween in New Orleans
Dat Dog
Dat Dog Halloween in New Orleans
Dat Dog Guinness Special
Dat Dog Halloween in New Orleans
Dat Dog Crawfish Etouffee Dog

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After our late-night munchies were satisfied, most of us turned in for the night. Paddy went across the street to watch a jazz band for awhile.

 

Day 2:

Thursday we slept in a bit, and then Paddy, Keith, and I headed for brunch at the New Orleans Cake Cafe. Located further into the Faubourg Marigny neighborhood, it is a little local hidden gem.

New Orleans Cake Cafe Halloween in New Orleans
New Orleans Cake Cafe

It is seat-yourself and order at the counter, and the food is delicious. We weren’t in the mood for sweets but the baked goods in the counter display case looked amazing. Paddy and Keith both had the boudin and eggs, which was a fried cake of boudin sausage, grits, eggs, and a buttery home-baked biscuit. I had the crab sandwich, which had crab, bacon, and brie on challah bread.

Boudin and eggs at New Orleans Cake Cafe
Boudin sausage, eggs, grits, and a biscuit at New Orleans Cake Cafe
Crab, brie, and bacon sandwich at New Orleans Cake Cafe
Crab, brie, and bacon sandwich at New Orleans Cake Cafe

After brunch we met up with our other friends to explore the French Quarter. We found a lot of interesting antique shops on Decatur Street, and a witchcraft store selling books, soaps, potions, oils, voodoo dolls, and other witchy items. The antiques in New Orleans are a lot older than in the stores we have been in back in Seattle. There are a lot of old turn of the century furniture and collectibles in New Orleans if you are looking for that sort of thing.

Decatur street antiques new orleans
Old rusty letters for sale at an antique store on Decatur Street
Decatur street antiques new orleans
Furniture at an antique store on Decatur street
French Quarter Halloween in New Orleans
French Quarter
Witchcraft store on Decatur Street Halloween in New Orleans
Witchcraft store on Decatur Street

We also explored the French Market, which reminded us a lot of Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Lots of vendors selling art, jewelry, crafts, souvenirs, food, and produce. I didn’t take any photos in the French Market because a lot of art vendors had “no photos” signs at their booths and I didn’t want to be an asshole. So you’ll just have to see it for yourself.

After walking around for a few hours, we needed a little break, and Paddy needed to have some oysters. We walked into the glaring tourist trap French Market Cafe on Decatur and headed to the upstairs bar. It was mid afternoon and fairly empty. We all had some overpriced drinks (the “sex on the bayou” was refreshing), rested our feet, and Paddy and I shared a dozen oysters. We love oysters, but couldn’t get our squeamish friends to give them a go.

oysters at the French Market Cafe New Orleans
Paddy enjoying some raw oysters at the French Market Cafe

After we were rested up, we walked through the French Quarter some more and then checked out the Voodoo Museum.

French Quarter
French Quarter

The Voodoo Museum is small, and is a $5.00 entry. We were told we could take photos. It was really interesting to learn about the symbolism and history of voodoo.

Voodoo Museum
Shrine, Voodoo Museum
Voodoo Museum
Voodoo dolls, Voodoo Museum

After learning all about voodoo and hoodoo, we took a look at the famous LaLaurie Mansion nearby on Royal Street. It is where Madame Delphine LaLaurie resided in the early 1800’s. There are stories of her deplorable treatment of slaves in the mansion, including a mysterious death of a slave girl falling from the window of one of the upper floors. In 1834 a fire broke out in the mansion, and Madame LaLaurie reportedly ran out into the street in a frenzy asking bystanders to assist her with her saving her valuables. Firemen inquired about the slaves and Madame LaLaurie refused to give them the keys to the attic slave quarters. The fire was put out, but seven tortured and mutilated slaves were found chained in the attic when the firemen broke down the door. Madame LaLaurie was driven out of town and an angry mob destroyed everything in the mansion.

LaLaurie Mansion New Orleans Halloween
LaLaurie Mansion

Madame LaLaurie was featured as a character in the fictional TV show American Horror Story: Coven. The show was fictional, but the character and her horrific treatment of her slaves was based on real history.

We walked around the French Quarter a bit more, admiring the Halloween decorations. Locals really get into Halloween in New Orleans, and there were quite a few decorated houses and apartments.

Halloween in New Orleans
Halloween decorations in the French Quarter
Halloween in New Orleans
Halloween decorations in the French Quarter

Halloween in New Orleans

 

Halloween in New Orleans
Paddy and I in front of a beautiful New Orleans house on the edge of the French Quarter

Later, we all re-convened for dinner. I had made a reservation (definitely recommended for larger groups) at Sobou, a new and hip subsidiary of the long-standing New Orleans institution Commander’s Palace. The name Sobou is short for “south of Bourbon.”

The menu was more tapas style than big plates, meant to order small plates to share. The cuisine was modern New Orleans fare, and everything looked amazing. The meal started off great, with cocktails and a few small bites including a smokey gumbo with mashed potatoes instead of rice, ahi tuna cones with avocado ice cream, fried pork rinds with honey-whipped bacon fat and 24-hour smoked pork rillette.

Sobou New Orleans
Sobou
Sobou New Orleans
Sobou
Sobou New Orleans tuna cones
Tuna cones: Raw tuna with avocado basil ice cream
Sobou New Orleans
Gumbo with a scoop of mashed potatoes
Sobou New Orleans
Cocktails at Sobou: The Funnycide and the Rowdy Hawaiian

The meal went south after the first round. We ordered more food and drinks, and our waitress took our order and completely disappeared for half an hour. Finally we inquired about our food with the bartender who said he would check on it. A few minutes later another cup of gumbo was brought out without a spoon, with an explanation that our food was put in on separate tickets. We had to go back to the bartender to get a spoon. Waitress still nowhere in site. We inquired again a few minutes later and our drinks were brought by another server, who said he would check on the rest of our food. We waited a bit longer, and then some more dishes were brought but we were still missing two, and the second gumbo was also brought by a food runner without a spoon. We asked if the rest was coming and he said he would check, that (again) it must have all been put on separate tickets. Waitress still nowhere in site.

We’ve all worked in the service industry, and we’ve all had off-nights. However, this was a little ridiculous. Finally, news of our multiple inquiries with the bartender on our food (and spoons) reached a manager, who came over and apologized profusely, had some shots sent over to our table and made sure the rest of our food came out. She promised some complimentary dessert as well. Our waitress came back finally, looking very sheepish and apologized for the confusion. We received a complimentary round of the bananas foster on the half shell and the “pecan pie not pie” which was served in a jar with peanut butter whipped cream and a chocolate covered pork cracklin’. It was delicious.

Sobou babanas foster new orleans
Bananas foster on the half shell

When we received our bill, in addition to the complimentary dessert and shots, the manager comped the first round of appetizers. I’d chock the service issues up to a bad night for the waitress, and would definitely go back. All of the food was outstanding, and the manager made it right by taking some things off of our bill. A class act all the way. Paddy is still raving about the foie gras burger he had.

After dinner we walked back towards Frenchmen Street on Bourbon Street, which was rowdier than the night before and smelled of vomit and farts. It was only 9:30, but you still had to watch where you stepped to avoid random splatters of puke on the street. Aside from a stop for Paddy and Devin to get some cigars, we hurried through.

Bourbon Street New Orleans
Cigars on Bourbon. Photo by Cassandra Whelan

Back on Frenchmen Street, the same group of musicians were playing on the corner for tips again, and had drawn an even bigger crowd. We went up to the balcony of Dat Dog and watched from above with drinks.

Frenchmen Street New Orleans
Watching the jazz band below from Dat Dog on Frenchmen Street. Photo by Cassandra Whelan
Frenchmen Street New Orleans
Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen Street New Orleans
Frenchmen Street

Frenchmen Street New Orleans

Dat Dog might be an unassuming fluorescently-lit hot dog restaurant, but it is a great spot to get some drinks and watch the action.

While we were watching the jazz band, a man and his wife set up some folding tables and table-top BBQs on the opposite corner of the street and started grilling. After the band ended, we couldn’t resist checking out what they had going on.

The cook’s name was Steve and he had gone to college in Seattle, so when he found out we were from Seattle he made a big to-do about it and we all got our photos taken with him.

BBQ Frenchmen Street New Orleans
Steve’s BBQ
BBQ Frenchmen Street New Orleans
Steve’s BBQ

The BBQ platter was huge, so we got a couple to share. It was $20, and well worth it. It included a sausage, some corn on the cobb, amazing mac and cheese, jambalaya, a piece of chicken, and the best sauteed garlic bacon cabbage I’ve ever had. If you see this man on Frenchmen Street–drop your dinner plans and get his food.

BBQ Frenchmen Street New Orleans
Steve’s BBQ platter. Best $20 you’ll ever spend.

 

Day 3:

 

On Friday morning Cassandra and I were up and ready to go get beignets and coffee at Cafe Du Monde at 10:00 AM, but we were only able to get two of the guys out of bed to come with us.

The line was long, but moved fairly quickly. There was another line for to-go coffee and beignets around the back that moved a bit faster, but we wanted to sit down.

Cafe Du Monde New Orleans
Cafe Du Monde

It was worth the wait. There are only beignets and coffee on the menu, and it is cash only. The floor is covered in powdered sugar and the dining area is open-air.

Cafe Du Monde New Orleans
Cafe Du Monde cafe au lait and beignets

After beignets and cafe au lait with chicory, we walked across the street to Jackson Square and admired the St Louis Cathedral, and checked out the art being sold on the edges of the park by local artists.

St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square New Orleans
Jackson Square
St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square New Orleans
St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square

Walking back to our hotels we walked by a house decorated in various mutilated baby dolls.

We were able to rouse Paddy when we got back to the condo, but Keith was still sleeping off a late night. We took an uber over to the Garden District where we had a 1:15 PM brunch reservation at Atchafalaya. We were a bit early, so we went up to the bar to order some drinks. The poor harried bartender was obviously on the tail end of a very busy brunch rush and it took awhile to get our vodka on ice for the bloody mary bar, but we were patient.

Atchafalaya New Orleans
Atchafalaya restaurant—Brunch highly recommended!

Bloody mary bar? Yes–a bloody mary bar!! With standard bloody mary mix and a green tomato bloody mary mix. There was also an entire array of pickled veggies, hot sauces, pepper, and lime wedges to customize your bloody mary.

Atchafalaya bloody mary bar New Orleans
Atchafalaya bloody mary bar
Atchafalaya bloody mary bar New Orleans
Atchafalaya bloody mary bar

Everything on the menu looked delicious. I finally narrowed it down to the duck confit hash, and Paddy had the shrimp with cream cheese grits. This was probably my favorite meal our whole trip, and if you plan on going to the Garden District while in New Orleans, make a reservation here and get brunch. It’s the best.

Duck confit hash at Atchafalaya in the Garden District
Duck confit hash at Atchafalaya in the Garden District
Shrimp with cream cheese grits at Actchafalaya New Orleans
Shrimp with cream cheese grits at Actchafalaya
Chicken and biscuits with sausage gravy at Atchafalaya New Orleans
Chicken and biscuits with sausage gravy at Atchafalaya

After we were full of brunch, we waddled around the Garden District and admired the houses and Layfayette Cemetery.

I had heard that the reason people are buried in above-ground  tombs in New Orleans is due to New Orleans being below sea level, causing bodies buried below ground to rise back up in the event of a flood. According to the Lafayette Cemetery website, however, the tombs are primarily a cultural tradition from the French and Spanish colonists.

In any event, the tombs are beautiful and intriguing.

Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery
Lafayette Cemetery New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery
Halloween in New Orleans Layfayette Cemetery
Lafayette Cemetery

The Garden District neighborhood of New Orleans is home to some of the most spectacular old French/Spanish colonial southern houses. The last time we visited New Orleans, Paddy and I walked all over the Garden District looking at houses until we were dead tired. This time, we just did a short tour to check out Anne Rice’s former house (the house she used as the setting for her books about the Mayfair witches) and the houses nearby to the Rice house.

If you are really interested in Garden District houses, most guidebooks for New Orleans will have a self-guided walking tour in them that tells you about some of the most impressive houses and where to find them.

Anne Rice's house in the Garden District
Anne Rice’s house in the Garden District
Anne Rice's house in the Garden District
Anne Rice’s house in the Garden District
Anne Rice's house in the Garden District
Anne Rice’s house in the Garden District
Garden District New Orleans
Garden District

After we were tired of walking, we took an Uber back to Frenchmen Street to take a nap in our rooms.

Later that evening Keith, Paddy, and I ventured out in search of sustenance, and had a solidly mediocre meal at Frank’s on Decatur Street. The food was too bland to recommend, but the price, nearby location, and lack of a wait for a table were all what we were looking for.

On the way back to our condo we passed the dead baby house from earlier, now all lit up and with a host. A middle aged man in a diaper and a baby mask pretended to grind baby dolls up in a “meat grinder” that spit out candy. His cat sat on a chair next to the front steps looking bored.

Halloween-in-New-Orleans 390
Keith and the “man baby” at the dead baby house
Halloween-in-New-Orleans 386
Dead baby house

There were a lot more decorations out on Friday night, it was fun to walk around the French Quarter and see the houses and hotels all decorated for Halloween. Some were really elaborate.

Halloween in New Orleans
Halloween in New Orleans
Scary clown house Halloween in New Orleans
Scary clown house– Halloween in New Orleans
Scary clown house Halloween in New Orleans
Scary clown house– Halloween in New Orleans
scary clown house Halloween in New Orleans
Scary clown house– Halloween in New Orleans

The weather forecast for Halloween in New Orleans was grim–predicting rain and thunderstorms all day and night on Saturday and Sunday. Fortunately, Halloween in New Orleans is not just one night. We had brought multiple costumes for the weekend, and Friday night ended up being the most fun night of our trip.

Well planning our trip, we thought a group costume would be fun and we found some banana costumes for $25 each. Paddy was not enthusiastic about the idea, but we peer pressured him into it.

Halloween in New Orleans
Halloween in New Orleans. Bananas!

Keith had his nun costume on earlier, and decided to keep his holy cross on with the banana costume. Ba-nun-a.

Halloween in New Orleans
Ba-Nun-a

We had some beers at our condo, and then ventured out onto Frenchmen Street. We immediately got a lot of attention. Everywhere we went people were yelling “bananas!” Paddy had an attitude change when he saw how much attention we were getting. He has always been a bit of a ham.

There were a lot of other impressive costumes as well. I was particularly impressed with these two ladies dressed as peacocks:

Halloween in New Orleans
Peacocks– Halloween in New Orleans
Narwhal costuems Halloween in New Orleans
Narwhals– Halloween in New Orleans
Angler Fish costume halloween in New Orleans
Angler fish costume– Halloween in New Orleans
Halloween in New Orleans
Halloween in New Orleans –I don’t know what this couple’s costume is, but it is amazing.
Halloween in New Orleans Beetlejuice and Lydia
Best Beetlejuice and Lydia I’ve ever seen

We decided that we had to go back to Bourbon Street to parade around a bit more and see more costumes. We ended up posing in a lot of peoples’ photos.

Waldos and Bananas Halloween in New Orleans
We kept finding Waldo. Everywhere.
Dr-Frankenfurter-Halloween in New Orleans
Dr. Frankenfurter
Rocky Horror Halloween in New Orleans
Keith and Rocky exchanging pleasantries
Halloween in New Orleans
Roy Orbison in drag?

We came across one of the several Tropical Isle bars on Bourbon, and decided that we needed their famous Shark Attack drink that I saw on Zane Lamprey’s Drinking Made Easy. The Tropical Isle is famous for it’s New Orleans Hand Grenade drink, which you will see people walking around with everywhere in long green souvenir cups. This is not the best drink at the Tropical Isle. The Shark Attack is made with a slurry of booze and other sugary ingredients, but that’s not the attraction.

Tropical Isle Halloween in New Orleans
Tropical Isle on Bourbon Street
Shark attacks Tropical Isle Halloween in New Orleans
Making the Shark Attacks

The best part of the Shark Attack is that it comes with a plastic shark that has grenadine poured in its mouth, overturned into the drink and therefore spilling “blood” into the water. Our bartender also threw in a little plastic alligator for good measure.

Drinks that come with a plastic shark overturned in them? What more could you want. Go to the Tropical Isle. Skip the Hand Grenade. Get the Shark Attack.

Shark attacks Tropical Isle Halloween in New Orleans
Shark Attacks at the Tropical Isle
Shark attacks Tropical Isle Halloween in New Orleans
Shark attacks at the Tropical Isle

Upstairs at the Tropical Isle we found a good balcony view of Bourbon Street, and a photo op.

Tropical Isle Halloween in New Orleans
Tropical Isle
Halloween in New Orleans
Bourbon Street

 

Day 4:

 

The next morning our condo living area was strewn with banana costumes and rubber sharks. Keith was still sleeping, so Paddy and I headed out to get some brunch.

Halloween in New Orleans
The aftermath.

We walked over to Horn’s restaurant, which came highly recommended by a friend of ours. There was a wait, but you could put yourself on the self-sign in wait list at the door. It wasn’t too long before we got a nice booth, coffee, and mimosas.

Horns New Orleans
Horn’s restaurant

The menu was a touch choice, everything looked amazing. I went with my friend’s suggestion of the Jewish Coonass which was two potato latkes topped with two eggs, grilled spinach, crawfish etouffee, and a biscuit on the side. Paddy had the Eggs Dauphine with jalepeno corn bread, pulled pork, egg, and hollandaise sauce. Both were fabulous.

Horns New Orleans
Jewish Coonass at Horn’s
Horns New Orleans
Horns

After breakfast we did some souvenir shopping on Decatur Street and then went back to bed for awhile to rest up for Halloween night.

The late afternoon brought torrents of rain as promised, and New Orleans even had a tornado warning for awhile according to the news.

Every Halloween in New Orleans, there is a small parade on Decatur Street and back down Bourbon Street starting at Molly’s in the Market on Decatur. The parade is Jim Monaghan’s Halloween Parade, not to be confused with the big Halloween parade done by the Krewe of Boo. The big Halloween parade was the weekend prior to Halloween, which we missed. We decided to check out Jim Monaghan’s Halloween Parade, despite the rain.

The parade was scheduled to start at 6:00 PM, and we ended up standing under umbrellas with a bunch of other spectators near the start of the parade route until 7:00 PM when the parade finally started. I don’t know if the weather had something to do with it, but the parade was pretty much just some people in costumes walking down the street and riding in carriages. A few beads were thrown. It was over within 10 minutes, or at least it appeared to be. Seeing as how you can see people parading around in costumes all over Bourbon Street and Frenchmen Street anyway, we kind of wished we’d skipped waiting in the rain. It was also dark, which made visibility difficult as well. I guess it literally rained on our parade.

Jim Monaghan's Halloween Parade
Jim Monaghan’s Halloween Parade
Jim Monaghan's Halloween Parade
Jim Monaghan’s Halloween Parade
Jim Monaghan's Halloween Parade
Jim Monaghan’s Halloween Parade

We were starving, so we headed back through the rain to Dat Dog for a quick dinner, then back to our condo to get in costume.

Paddy, Keith and I had tickets to the annual Endless Night Vampire Ball at the House of Blues. It is New Orleans, home of Anne Rice, and a vampire ball seemed appropriate. Because the weather was so bad, we were happy that we did our street-partying together with the group the night before, and had a dry indoor venue for tonight.

Our other friends came over to join us and have a few pre-funk drinks before going out. Keith went with a “Lone Ranger” style vampire costume, and Paddy and I went a bit more traditional. They both got some really creepy contact lenses. I was jealous–I need prescription so I couldn’t get them.

vampire ball Halloween in New Orleans
Keith, Whitney, and Paddy getting ready for the vampire ball

vampire ball Halloween in New Orleans

vampire ball Halloween in New Orleans
Getting ready for the vampire ball

The Vampire Ball was full of very serious costumes. They have a strict dress code–no street wear. I did see a few random costumes there as well, so they must not be super strict with the vampire dress code. I’d recommend putting a good vampire costume together, but it seemed like any well-done costume was sufficient. Each year has a different theme, and this year’s theme was Penny Dreadful (1800’s London horror). There were a lot of costumes that went with the theme, and many that didn’t. All of them were interesting.

Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball–this lady sewed her own dress! Amazing.
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Keith, our blood-sucking cowboy

The House of Blues is a huge venue, and in addition to the main stage, there was a side room with a small stage as well. A vampire belly dancer put on a burlesque performance on the side stage involving eating live worms and drinking blood. I don’t know if the blood was real, but the worms were. Ew.

Endless Night Vampire Ball

Endless Night Vampire Ball

On the main stage were several musical acts, an aerialist, and more vampire belly dancers, some with live snakes. It was all very entertaining.

Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball

Endless Night Vampire Ball

Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball
Endless Night Vampire Ball

Around midnight we decided to head back to Frenchmen Street to see how the Halloween party was going there. Unfortunately, our friends were tired from the night before and sick of walking around in the rain, so they went to bed early. The rain was a disappointment, Frenchmen Street was not nearly as packed with costumed revelers as in the photos I’d seen of previous Halloween in New Orleans.

We had a great time Friday night though, and the Vampire Ball was pretty spectacular. I’m glad we didn’t have only Halloween night to celebrate with the weather being so wet.

 

Day 5:

 

On Sunday we had to check out by 11:00 AM, but our flight wasn’t until 6:30 PM. We weren’t able to do a late checkout, but the 519 Frenchmen was happy to store our luggage for us for the day. While we were packing, my blood sugar was taking a steep dive, so I went down the street to Cafe Rose Nicaud for lattes and some delicious biscuit “sammies” to go. The rain was still pouring, and I was glad I’d brought an umbrella on this trip.

At 11:00 we met up with the rest of our friends and went to brunch at Horn’s again. The wait was longer for five of us, but we didn’t have anything better to do and there was a covered area outside the door to shelter us from the rain.

Paddy had the Waffle Couchon, which was a cornbread waffle topped with pulled pork, chimichurri sauce and pickled peppers. I had the Chicken and Waffle, which was a sweet potato waffle with fried chicken and BBQ sauce. I was a little disappointed with my chicken and waffle, I thought it needed some type of light gravy or something other than BBQ sauce, and the waffle was a little on the sweet side for me. Paddy was raving about his Waffle Couchon.

Waffle Couchon at Horns New Orleans
Waffle Couchon at Horns
Chicken and waffle at Horns New Orleans
Chicken and waffle at Horns

After brunch, we still had a couple hours to kill but we were low on money and it was pouring rain. We figured we should just head to the airport and have some drinks at a bar.

Unfortunately, Alaskan Air only seemed to have one flight that day–ours. This meant that the ticket counter was closed and we couldn’t check our bags until 4:00 PM, so we had to kill two hours sitting in the check in area. There were some limited concessions outside the security area, but there really is only so much you can do with large suitcases. Normally we try not to check bags for domestic flights, but my ballgown for the vampire ball alone took up a whole suitcase in addition to our other costumes.

We made it home on a plane with broken wifi and continuously coughing and farting passengers. All in all, it was a great trip and we would definitely like to do Halloween in New Orleans again. Next time we’d really like to see the big Krewe of Boo Halloween parade, and maybe do a haunted history tour. As for New Orleans in general, if we go back during a time other than Halloween we’d like to explore some neighborhoods outside of the French Quarter a little more and rent a car and get out of the city a bit. We did a swamp tour the first time we went to New Orleans and I’d like to do that again. There is so much to see. We will be back.